Editorials

Arctic spring comes weeks earlier — In the Earths cold and icy far north, the harsh winters are giving way to spring…

Why are there so many more species of butterflies? — In a study appearing in the April issue of the American Naturalist, McPeek and Brown…

Maculinea caterpillars do not want to grow up — For many years, ecologists from the Centre of Environment and Hydrology (CEH) have…

The European lepidopterological society with a new site — The European society for the study of moths and butterflies launched today a new…

Last updated: Wednesday, 3 November 2010 11:06 GMT
Moths cloaked in colour

Moths cloaked in colour

Travellers to the neotropics - the tropical lands of the Americas - might be forgiven for thinking that all of the colourful insects flittering over sunny puddles or among dense forest understory are butterflies. In fact, many are not. Some are moths that have reinvented themselves as butterflies, converging on the daytime niche typically dominated by their less hairy relatives. Now, a new revision of the taxonomic relationships among one such group of insects, the subfamily Dioptinae, sheds light on the diversity of tropical moth species and presents a unique story of parallel evolution…


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Maculinea arion underside in Somerset, UK, (c) David Simcox, Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, UKResearchers publish the discoveries that saved Maculinea arion in the UK

Lepidopterology
On the 25th anniversary of the project that brought the large blue butterfly back from extinction in the United Kingdom,…

This is a picture of the new moth species, Lithophane leeae, (c) Bruce Walsh, the University of ArizonaBiologist discovers pink-winged moth in Chiracahua Mountains

Lepidopterology
University of Arizona biologist Bruce Walsh has identified a new species of moth in southern Arizona. Normally, this is not…

Oliver found that the eyespots of some butterflies, such as this pair of mating Bicyclus anynana, serve to both attract mates and ward off predators, (c) William PielSexy or repulsive? Butterfly wings can be both to mates and predators

Lepidopterology
Butterflies seem able to both attract mates and ward off predators using different sides of their wings, according to new…

Tobacco hornworm moth, Manduca sexta, sucks nectar from its favourite nectar source, the flower of sacred datura, Datura wrightii, (c) Charles Hedgcock RBPHow moths key into the scent of a flower

Lepidopterology
Moths need just the essence of a flower's scent to identify it, according to new research from The University of Arizona…
Environment

On the way to CO2 free power plants

— The Technische Universitaet Darmstadt dedicated today a pilot plant for capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) contained in flue gases of power plants. Its Institute for Energy Systems and Technology plans to utilise the plant for investigating two innovative methods for CO2 capture that require less energy and lower operating costs than earlier approaches…

Lepidopterology

Scientists trace evolution of butterflies infected with deadly bacteria

— Scientists at the University of Liverpool have traced the evolution of a species of tropical butterfly, infected with a bacterium that kills males, by comparing current butterfly populations with more than 200 museum specimens…

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